WaterFire

Announcing the 2019 #Art4Impact Series and WaterFire Season Schedule

To celebrate 25 years of transforming a place and building community in Providence, RI, WaterFire Providence announces its inaugural #Art4Impact series of events. The #Art4Impact series will include three themed series of WaterFire lightings and events with each series highlighting community milestones, challenges or issues that WaterFire has been helping… Read More »Announcing the 2019 #Art4Impact Series and WaterFire Season Schedule

President and Prime Minister of Portugal Visit Providence for WaterFire and RI Day of Portugal Celebration

Sunday, June 10th, 2018 was certainly a momentous day in Providence, it was the final day of PVDFest and the second of two days of annual celebration of Portuguese heritage and history that comprises Rhode Island Day of Portugal. This day was the 41st RI Day of Portugal celebration and there… Read More »President and Prime Minister of Portugal Visit Providence for WaterFire and RI Day of Portugal Celebration

WaterFire Providence Statement About Brown’s Exhibition Cancellation

Regarding the planned exhibition of artist Ryan Mendoza’s “2672 South Deacon” at the WaterFire Arts Center. PROVIDENCE, RI (09 February 2018) – Brown University’s withdrawal from our partnership exhibiting artist Ryan Mendoza’s “2672 South Deacon” has not changed our passion regarding the importance of the work. The art installation includes… Read More »WaterFire Providence Statement About Brown’s Exhibition Cancellation

Building for the Future | Episode 27 Historic Architectural Elements

Standout Historical Features

There are many historical features that make the WaterFire Arts Center unique. When the building was owned by the US Rubber company it had different needs than it does today. Those needs demanded solutions that we no longer commonly see today. But those original provisions make the WFAC unique.

The WFAC has a great number of large windows. This allowed the maximum amount of natural sunlight to enter the building, and minimize the amount of electrical light needed to function in a time when electricity and electric lighting were much more expensive than today.

The large scrolling doors were tall enough to allow full-size locomotives to enter the space and unload cargoes of rubber, and deliver finished product out.

Read More »Building for the Future | Episode 27 Historic Architectural Elements

Building for the Future Episode 26 | Electrical

Electrical Systems Make Us Glow! Nothing can compare to our bonfires on the rivers of Providence. But our electrical systems make the WaterFire Arts Center a stunning place to be! Supplementing our natural light, mandatory during the night, our lighting fixtures were chosen to be appropriate to the age and industrial history of our… Read More »Building for the Future Episode 26 | Electrical